The Cookbooks

With our inaugural recipe posting from Milwaukee’s Pabst Mansion just around the corner – complete with info on history and etiquette from the early 20th century – we thought we’d give you some easy (i.e. pictorial) reading this Friday afternoon. Unfortunately, the road to Hell, as they say, is paved with good intentions and somehow the zipped file of photos we had brought with us to populate this blog post didn’t make the jump over the Great Lakes.

It seemed to us that grabbing a bunch of random pics off of the Internet wouldn’t do our project justice, and we really started to feel despondent. Luckily, our roomie/IT guy-extraordinaire, came to our rescue and unlocked the photos. Thanks! Scroll down for some of the recipe sources for Project Vintage Eats.

A coupla more housekeeping items: two more people have signed up to contribute blog posts to our project. Barth Anderson, author and Luchador mejor behind Fair Food Fight, just acquiesced (AND will feature Vintage Eats in an interview coming soon). Samantha Carney, lalaconcierge on Twitter and (soon to be updated) WordPress, will also team up with us to bring you a few dishes from Charleston Receipts (a book that we both  pooh-poohed and passed up the first time around).

Interested in collaborating too? Email us at projectvintageeats@gmail.com. We’d also like to invite you to send us photos of your own antique cookbooks, recipe scraps, and household manuals. We’ll post them to our Facebook page all day today – just send them our way. We’re looking forward to hearing from you!

Til Monday at noon, friends. Pabst Mansion, here we come..

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Published in: on 6 May, 2011 at 12:00  Comments (1)  

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  1. […] or at least, with one eye aimed in that direction. Asking readers for old family recipes and pictures of old cookbooks, Jen is particularly fond of the world as it was a century ago, and, in Vintage Eats’ most […]


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